Foamer Advice?

#1
Has anyone used the foamers that attch to a compressor to create a really thick foam? We recently purchased one of these and aside from the fact that the compressor is a bit bulky it looks like it will work good. Any suggestions on use would be appreciated and I will in turn post our results from our use of the foamer in the feild.

Matt

p.s. we have tried the foam cannon and it doesnt seem to produce the rich foam we are looking for to cling to the vertical ducts.


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#2
Hi Matt,

Never have tried using a air compressor to apply our degreasers. We use diaphram pumps, hose end sprayers, pump-ups, etc. The product that we use Bonzi a potassium hydroxide based product that does a good job of clinging to surfaces by itself.

Sometimes we fill our hoses with the degreaser and then use the hose end sprayer with the same product in it and then we can use a foamer end. This keeps the mist down. We push the product out of the hose with our pressure washer.

Dave Olson

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Tidy Powerwash Service, Inc. P.O. Box 781, Catlin, Illinois 61817 Phone 217-427-5557, Fax 217-427-2632 We are a commercial cleaning contractor serving East-Central Illinois and West Central Indiana since 1984. http://www.tps-inc.com/preswash.htm
 

David Saulque

<b>PWN TEAM - Hood Moderator</b><br<b><font color=
#3
I too have used the Foam Cannon with poor results, would like learn more about this item. I have had poor results with Bonzi as well.

David

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#4
I've never used a foamer, but have used BONZI and havn't been thrilled if it either.
We thicken our caustics with corn starch and it works well for use, we too use 12 volt pumps, pump up sprayers and the likes.

Richard


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David Saulque

<b>PWN TEAM - Hood Moderator</b><br<b><font color=
#5
Richard

Try an EX Jet and a Coke canister and a small compressor. What you do is fill the canister with chemical and attach the compressor to the canister with flex air hose & on the other end of the canister out comes the chem. The thing that I like about this system is no chem. goes through the pump(compressor) & on top of this you have very good psi of hot chem. Now I don't have to replace the elect. chem. pumps. I have used this system for 3 years. The Ex Jet is used on the roof and in other locations.

David

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#6
David,
how many feet of the discharge hose can you run 150' - 200'? How much psi will it handle 100 - 125 ?
I think I've got a old beer keg somewhere wonder if that'll work.
I'm definitley gonna do it, its gotta be better than running the caustic throuhg the pumps.
Thanks
Richard


I wonder if it would have enough pressure to be able to use a duct spinner to apply the chem.?

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#7
Richard, if you use the pepsi can, it goes up on the roof and into the kitchen with you. No need to drag a couple of hundred feet of hose with you. The coke can weighs about 30/35 pounds with chemical. I think your beer can would be heavier and bulkier. The nice thing about the coke can is the portability. you can also carry 2 coke cans mixed differently depending upon the type and amount of grease. Or you can have one can on the roof, while the other is used to pre-soak the duct and plenum from inside the kitchen. I used to have a 12V shur flo pump in the van, with 200 feet of hose on a reel. The coke can is faster, cheaper, and takes up less room. I have used Bonzai in the past. It was much better than my previous chemical. But I have found better and less expensive. David also has a good line on chemical.

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David Saulque

<b>PWN TEAM - Hood Moderator</b><br<b><font color=
#8
I don't know about a beer keg-not good to carry around I would say. The canisters that I refer to are 3 gal., the ones that are used in small to med. volume restaurants-you should be able to get one for free. I have a parts house who carries the parts. You run power off a wall plug to the compressor-then a 10-20-30 foot line to the canister. From the canister to the hood- lets say a working space of 20 plus feet. You would have no reason to go 150 feet or more, you are limited only by the location of a outlet plug. The psi is only 100-150-you can't run a spinner. Look at it like this this would replace the garden pump and the elect. pump only.

David

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#9
We have used the pump up sprayers for years (we even hired a guy recently who had been doing grease for 5 years and was still using a squirt bottle! He has really big forearms!) and have found them to be fairly reliable. I am wondering if the method of using the pumps or the coke canisters is cost effective as far as how much chemical is used? Does your chemical actually work longer if you pump more on at a time reducing the amount of pressure washing or scraping you have to do? This is what I was trying to achive with the foamer(original post) a method that would make the chemical do most of the work. We have some very reliable chemicals (but always looking for better ones!) and we are trying to refine our methods to speed up the jobs and get everything down to bare metal.

Matt

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#10
To pump up my coke can, I use a tank of nitrogen, I always have one in the van for fire extinguisher recharges. I have seen 12 Volt compressors for sale somewhere. The pepsi cans have a relief valve set at about 125 PSI, so you cannot put more pressure in one than that. Coke cans do not have a relief valve. I usually use 100PSI in the cans, that is enough to get one job done. I open the relief valve when we go to the next job. I have had the valve open and squirt the chemical on the floor of the van. We prressurize the cans in the van, less stuff to carry into the resturant. I'd like to see the resturant owner when you carry your own keg of beer into the job.

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#11
I didn't think about the portability, I was thinking of the keg being permanent in the van, but after i think about it the cannister would be much better.
Thanks guys

Richard


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A

AlwaysUnderPressureInc

Guest
#12
<FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Just an Idea, I am sure you have seen the pool guys with the cart that they use to carry a 12v battery to run there pool cleaner pump, if you make something along the same lines you can put a small compressor and battery + your canister on that and save yourself some carrying and time. Just an idea
PS Anyone doing hoods in south florida, broward area? Email me as I may be able to hook you up if you are good at what you do. I do strictly exterior so I have people wanting good hood guys. must be reliable and do a good job. Thanks Mike</FONT f>


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#13
MBryan said:
Has anyone used the foamers that attch to a compressor to create a really thick foam? We recently purchased one of these and aside from the fact that the compressor is a bit bulky it looks like it will work good. Any suggestions on use would be appreciated and I will in turn post our results from our use of the foamer in the feild.

Matt

p.s. we have tried the foam cannon and it doesnt seem to produce the rich foam we are looking for to cling to the vertical ducts.
http://www.bryanexhaust.com


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There sure have been a lot of changes in our industry since I first asked this question 7 years ago.

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#14
MBryan said:
p.s. we have tried the foam cannon and it doesnt seem to produce the rich foam we are looking for to cling to the vertical ducts.
http://www.bryanexhaust.com


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Got that Foam Cannon to work good too.

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#15
I have done hoods for about 25 years, changes have been made in methods, chemicals, & tools. There have been some individuals who have been leaders in our industry. In no particular order:
Daryl Myrza who developed the first large duct business, Ducts Unlimited.

Robert and Larry at who first used the internet for their business and had the first board. That board allowed many of us to share information, and grow our businesses.

Phil Ackland started cleaning hoods. He has since authored manuals for cleaning. He had the first credible certifiacation program and sits on the NFPA 96 committee.

Now we have Matt Bryan, who has developed new methods of cleaning exhaust systems. He started Grease Police, a board devoted to greasers. The Grease Police has evolved into an organization with a different way of doing business. New equipment, chemicals, and methods have allowed us to perform our jobs faster with much better results. Though the BBS is a bit rough, our perfomance standards are high, too high for some. Not all who apply for Grease Police membership are accepted. Some who have been accepted have not met expectations and have had membership revoked. Members of Grease Police are working for solutions to our common problems and expect to have a positive influence on the industry.
 

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